Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Wouldn't it be great if you could just call up a supercomputer and ask it to do your data-wrangling for you? Actually, scratch that, no-one uses the phone anymore. What'd be really cool is if machines could respond to your queries straight from Twitter. It's a belief that's shared by Wolfram Research, which has just launched the Tweet a Program system to its computational knowledge engine, Wolfram Alpha. In a blog post, founder Stephen Wolfram explains that even complex queries can be executed within the space of 140 characters, including data visualizations. If you fancy giving it a go yourself, you can tweet queries to @wolframtap, but be advised that you'll have to learn the basics of the Wolfram Language Code before it'll give you anything in return.

0 Comments

Linux users, you've been very, very, very, very, very, very patient. And now, your patience is being rewarded with Netflix support on your OS of choice. For the longest time Netflix relied on Microsoft's would-be flash competitor Silverlight. But, of course, support for the plug in was practically non-existent on the open-source OS. Now, with Silverlight fading, and Netflix embracing the power of HTML5, your wish of watching flicks in your favorite distro (be it Ubuntu, Mint or Arch) may finally come true. Paul Adolf from Netflix posted a message to Ubuntu developers, telling them that, "Netflix will play with Chrome stable in 14.02 if NSS version 3.16.2 or greater is installed."

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

iCloud Drive

iOS 8 might working its way to iPhones and iPads, but Apple's long-awaited desktop refresh, Yosemite, is still receiving the final tweaks before it launches to the public. One element that features prominently between both platforms is iCloud Drive, Apple's own version of Dropbox. It's now available to mobile users, but Mac users can't enjoy its file-syncing features if they're using older versions of OS X. However, and this doesn't happen often, Windows users can get in on the action before their Mac-toting counterparts. In an updated version of the iCloud for Windows, Apple has added full support for iCloud Drive, letting PC owners interact with their files and documents from the comfort of their desktop. Mac users, of course, will enjoy additional iCloud features when Yosemite launches in the coming weeks, but for now, Windows users with iPhones and iPads can enjoy a very rare period of privileged access.

0 Comments

Belkin Crock-Pot Smart Slow Cooker review: Can WiFi make cooking easier?Frying, baking, grilling, searing, boiling, roasting -- whatever the method, I love to cook. It's not always easy, and sometimes it's just plain hard work, but at least it's the kind of work I enjoy. Even so, I've never used a slow cooker, and have always been a little jealous of my friends who have one. Put ingredients in and deliciousness comes out. It seems so easy!

Since I hadn't yet run out to my nearest Target to add a slow cooker to my kitchen collection, I jumped at the chance to try the Belkin Crock-Pot Smart Slow Cooker with WeMo. The name is a bit of a mouthful, but the idea of a slow cooker I could monitor remotely seemed like a definite plus -- using it to check on the things I cook and making adjustments as needed. And in this case, I could do it from my phone, even while riding on the train or walking to my apartment. Convenient!

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

I'm a late Wednesday afternoon tweeter. It's not a characteristic I'd necessarily include on any of my dating app profiles, but it accurately sums up my online behavior nonetheless. I'm also a tremendous neurotic (which should come as no surprise to anyone who knows me well) who embraces self-expression, challenges and change. I'm that personality pie chart you see up above. I'm an open book, or at least my Twitter profile is to IBM.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

You don't need a fancy current-gen console to stream all those Sony classics -- the company announced last night that its Netflix-esque PlayStation Now open beta is finally, well, open to PlayStation 3 owners in the United States and Canada. It's about time, really: PS3 owners have been part of the more selective closed beta program since January, but Sony opened the early access gates to folks with PlayStation 4s first. As always, though, be sure to keep a few things in mind before you take the plunge. You'll get access to some 150 PS3 titles as part of the deal (including forthcoming hits like inFAMOUS and Ultra Street Fighter IV) but rental prices for these games tend to range between $3 and $20. That span isn't awful, but considering you'd be able to pick up physical copies of some of those games for about the same price, you'll have to think about just how valuable picking up new games while immobile on the couch really is.

0 Comments

Microsoft To Acquire Maker Of Popular Minecraft Game For 2.5 Billion

Microsoft announced this week that it's buying hugely popular game franchise Minecraft for $2.5 billion. For that money, Microsoft gets rights to the game and ownership of its Stockholm, Sweden-based development studio, Mojang. It doesn't retain the company's founders or Minecraft's infamously outspoken creator, Markus "Notch" Persson.

Does that sound like a lot, $2.5 billion? Well, it is in human dollars, but not so much when you're Microsoft and you've got $85 billion in "cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments." Regardless of the fact that this week's deal only cost Microsoft around 3 percent of the money it has on-hand, here's the real kicker (in the form of a statement from Microsoft): "Microsoft expects the acquisition to be break-even in FY15 on a GAAP basis." Woof, that's a doozy of a sentence right there.

Here's the translation: Microsoft expects the purchase of Minecraft/Mojang to have made back the $2.5 billion it cost by July 1, 2015. And that is why Microsoft bought Minecraft.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

AT&T isn't the only carrier not getting WiFi calling until 2015 -- a certain red-branded network's iPhone 6 and 6 Plus won't, either. Speaking at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Media, Communications and Entertainment Conference, Verizon's CFO Fran Shammo said that his company has some back-end work to finish up before the feature goes live. This is something he predicts should happen around halfway through next year. What's more, he said that WiFi calling was never a top priority, either, as spotted by FierceWireless.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

After a year of development and another year on life support, Clang -- the sword-fighting game from science fiction writer Neal Stephenson and Subutai games -- is finally dead. Thing started off well enough after it topped its $500,000 crowdfunding goal on Kickstarter and an early beta was released to Steam. But a year later the Kickstarter cash ran out and Stephenson, reduced to working part-time on the project, said that the prototype "wasn't very fun to play." With no more cash to improve it, Clang has now been terminated, though Kickstarter investors can receive a refund on request. Stephenson accepted part of the blame in the final update post, adding that the story of the failure could fill a book. In fact, he did write a short book about it, which may eventually get published -- we imagine that would be far more interesting than the game itself.

[Image credit: Subutai Corp.]

0 Comments

FRANCE-LOGO-YOUTUBE

Google has gone on record as saying it loves original YouTube content like Epic Rap Battles of History, and now it looks as though the outfit is doubling down on such. How so? Well it seems that its fully-stocked studio spaces for partners are just the beginning. YouTube is investing millions into its partner channels, according to Recode. And it's part of a more concerted push into different types of content, replete with varying lengths and formats, too. That includes partnering with Hollywood producers, according to Recode's sources, which naturally gives Google something to sell. The wording on head of YouTube Originals Alex Carloss' blog post makes it sound like the firm's existing pool of talent will be commissioned to do new shows -- albeit with a heavier infusion of cash than they're used to. It sounds like it could be a solid deal for everyone involved: affording content creators more money for their work and pushing YouTube's hopes of becoming a more TV-like experience another step closer to reality.

[Image credit: Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images]

0 Comments

Must Reads