Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Five Nights at Freddy's is a terrifying game series about gruesome murders, dead children and haunted animatronic creatures a la Chuck-E-Cheese meets Poltergeist. Yep, it's everything awful about your childhood nightmares, sprinkled with a dash of dehydrated parmesan. Good news, disturbed youth: Five Nights at Freddy's 4: The Final Chapter is happening and it's due out on Halloween. Five Nights at Freddy's has seen rapid success since its debut in August 2014, thanks in large part to YouTube's gaming stars, who are always up for a good scare. The series, created by Scott Cawthon, has done so well that Warner Bros. recently picked up the film rights and is working on a movie. Fingers crossed for a feel-good rom-com.

0 Comments

After a few days of hearing complaints on the internet, Valve is removing the payment feature from the Skyrim Workshop on Steam. The PC gaming juggernaut explains that it underestimated the differences between the communities built around its own games and those from other studios, and toeing the waters of an established modding scene like one surrounding The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim's "was probably not the right place to start" experimenting.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

LG Watch Urbane in gold

You no longer have to wait for AT&T (or go through an importer) to buy LG's ritzy-looking Watch Urbane in the US -- it's available to order today. Google is now carrying the upscale Android Wear timepiece in its store with a $349 price tag, which is pretty reasonable for a gadget crafted from leather and steel. The only catch is the roughly two-week shipping delay as of this writing. But hey, what's a relatively short wait if it means (hopefully) impressing your smartwatch-savvy friends?

0 Comments

Halo: Combat Evolved may have been one of the first console shooters to hit the competitive gaming circuit but a recent tournament was derailed because almost six months later, The Master Chief Collection is still broken. The official Halo eSports league, Halo Championship Series, had to cancel the first online cup of the regular season over the weekend due to connectivity issues. Seriously. As Eurogamer reports, games took place on Saturday but went off the rails on Sunday for the competition's conclusion.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Google's Berlin office

European publishers have long chastised Google for allegedly hurting their bottom line, but the internet giant is now trying to meet them half way. It's launching a partnership with eight news outlets (including the UK's Financial Times and Guardian) that will develop publisher-friendly products and create a €150 million ($163 million) "innovation fund." The hope is that the collaboration will keep journalism viable in an era where you can sometimes get the gist of a story through a simple web search.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Company Signs

Best Buy, one of the largest Apple Pay holdouts, is changing its mind. Apple CEO Tim Cook just announced during its earnings call that Best Buy stores will support Apple Pay later this year. It's also available starting today within Best Buy's mobile apps. The news comes only a few hours after we learned the service will soon be supporting Discover cards, making it compatible with the top four biggest credit card companies int he U.S. Best Buy's reversal is especially interesting since its a member of MCX (Merchant Customer Exchange), a joint initiative between big retailers like Walmart and Target to support their own mobile payments app, dubbed CurrentC. None of the MCX members supported Apple Pay when it launched last fall (though Target's mobile app does support it now), so Best Buy's flip-flop might be a sign that we'll see wider support eventually.

[Photo source: Getty Images]

0 Comments

US IT INTERNET LIFESTYLE APPLE

Back in January this year, Apple recorded a blockbuster of a quarter thanks to holiday sales of its new, larger-screened handsets. It sold a whopping 74.5 million iPhones in the last three months of 2014, chalking up $74.6 billion in revenue in the process. While today's second quarter results don't quite match that number, Cook & co. still managed to rake in a respectable amount of cash: According to the report, Apple made around $58 billion and sold close to 61 million iPhones in the first three months of 2015 alone. That makes this the most successful March quarter in the company's history. This is in large part due to Apple's rising popularity in China, having brought in $16.8 billion in revenue from the country in the past three months. Indeed, China is now Apple's second-biggest market (Americas is still the first), with Europe falling to third place.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

When you're spending most part of the day out and about, chances are at some point you'll have to whip out your portable battery to juice up your smartphone. This usually means stacking your phone on top of a cable-wrapped power bank, and then clumsily holding everything together with one hand. Doesn't sound very 2015, does it? It's annoying enough for a startup called Rubix to come up with a solution: slap a magnetized Qi wireless charging case (aka On Case) on your phone, and then let it snap onto a magnetized wireless charging battery (aka On Charger). Look ma, no cable!

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Unstoppable / Vienna, Austria (2013)

Unlike forest fires, you personally can't do much to stop trainwrecks. With that in mind, the folks over at General Electric took a break from tracking your brain on BBQ and devised a way to keep one of the oldest forms of powered-transport on track in adverse weather conditions. You see, the Ardennes Forest in Belgium is legendary for its inhospitable conditions and to sidestep them and the mountains, trains were taking a longer, flatter and more expensive route. That wasn't too economical. So, GE implemented what it calls the Advanced Rail Cleaner for trains on the route. Essentially, the ARC is a module that sits at a precise spot ahead of the front axle and uses high-pressure air (rather than lasers) moving at supersonic speeds to clear away any moisture and debris.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

While air travel is quicker and safer than driving, it's also louder. The continuous low-frequency drone of the engines is why some people invest in noise-canceling headphones. To help reduce that non-stop hum, researchers at North Carolina State University and MIT have developed a thin membrane to be inserted into the lightweight honeycomb structure of planes and helicopters. "At low frequencies – sounds below 500 Hertz – the honeycomb panel with the membrane blocks 100 to 1,000 times more sound energy than the panel without a membrane." said Yun Jing, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NC State University. The 0.25mm-thick membrane would only add an additional six percent to the overall weight of the honeycomb structure of aircraft. While that doesn't seem like much, every ounce counts to airlines trying to maximize flight costs. It'll be on them to decide whether they'd rather save money on fuel or makes cabins a better place for passengers.

0 Comments

Must Reads